bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)
bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /
Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 
It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)

bonsikoy:

Last words on the last books of different book series. [Part one]

even though I really like some of these books, these lines give me a : /

Like, they all seem so pollyanna-ish, especially given how “dark” many of these are?  Is this because they are series? Or YA? 

It’s almost as if last lines from other literature are responding to them:

"Yes," I said. "Isn’t it pretty to think so?" (The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway)

Or, you know, how landmark dystopian novels tend to end:

"He loved Big Brother." (1984, George Orwell)

or

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." (Animal Farm, George Orwell)

Or if you want to look at books for a lower age:

"And it was still warm." (Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak)

And the best maybe of all time:

"So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past." (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald)

(via cassycas)

lowkeywalker:

come-to-my-world:

Ok, so I don’t know how I ended up here and woah!

they made

image

characters

image

for

image

every

image

single

image

element

image

of the

image

periodic

image

table!

image

And also they made this

image

and this

image

*new ship* 

There’s even a granny!

image

It’s like

image

superheros

image

(there’s a guy who looks like Hulk btw)

image

and humans

image

and there are

image

twins!!

image

And Bethoveen

image

THEY MADE THOR

image

And there’s also this which made me laugh

image

I can’t! 

image

(source)

this is the coolest shit b.

(via cloudnoodle)

macklesufficient:

"villain" characters in hp who are more interesting than severus snape:

-regulus black
-peter pettigrew (!!!)
-narcissa malfoy
-gellert grindlewald
-regulus black
-barty crouch jr.
-horace slughorn
-regulus black
-kreacher the house elf
-dolores umbridge
-regulus black
-rEGULUS ARCTURUS BLACK

(via agnosticheadstrongman)

Q

thewritersramblings asked:

CAN WE TALK ABOUT MIDDLE EASTERN WITCHES AND WIZARDS THOUGH. AND HOW THEY'RE SPELLS WOULD OBVIOUSLY NOT BE LATIN, GREEK OR ANGLO SAXON, BUT INSTEAD LIKE ANCIENT PHOENICIAN, OR SOMETHING. AND THAT THEIR TIES BETWEEN SPELLS AND MAGIC WOULD BE STRONGER SINCE THEIR WORDS ARE MORE ANCIENT AND FAR OLDER SO THEY'D BE WAY MORE POWERFUL???? SORRY FOR THE CAPS?????

A

karnythia:

asterionboy:

strawberrypatty:

avatar-trisana:

amarielah:

bramblepatch:

shiraglassman:

avatar-trisana:

thejewsareinspace:

thecompleteillustrated:

petrichorlore:

petrichorlore:

NEVER APOLOGIZE FOR CAPS. PHOENICIAN SPELLS. ARAMAIC SPELLS. LANGUAGES MUGGLES DON’T KNOW ANYMORE THAT HAVE BEEN PRESERVED THROUGH WIZARDING SPELLS IN LITTLE POCKETS OF THE WORLD. SOURCE LANGUAGES NO ONE KNOWS HOW TO ADAPT OR CHANGE ANYMORE BECAUSE THE LANGUAGES HAVE DIED AND PEOPLE ARE AFRAID TO CAUSE LIKE, A NUCLEAR FALLOUT. IM SO EXCITED THANKS FOR THIS.

 (the-writers-ramblings

Aramaic?

Um guys like the most famous spell in Harry Potter is Aramaic

okay second most famous because the movies made wingardium leviosa such a thing but avada kedavra is taken from Aramaic

that’s all, carry on

(This thread has lots of cool stuff - it was just too long for my blog but do click back)

commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.
commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."
- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.

commissionergorgon:

avatarparallels:

"Of Aang’s three children, Bumi was the one who most encapsulated his father’s penguin-sledding spirit."

- Bumi’s Bio on The Official Nickelodeon Website.

I see so much of Aang in Bumi, which is why his feelings of disconnect from his father break my heart.

(via feelsforeverything)

zoologicalpt:

BIRD BEAAAKS. This one doesn’t teach how to draw but it0s the introduction to that. Quite a lot of people I give classes to have this idea that the beak is an apendix of the bird’s skull and not a part of the skull that doesn’t have feathers covering it. And because of that wrong notion beaks are drawn poorly and with no sense of weight or even being part of the bird’s head.
So this art tip of the week is just the very introduction to the concept of drawing beaks. Just explaining what the beak actually is.
Hope you like it, even though its a simpler one. 
CHEERS and tons of love
zoologicalpt:

BIRD BEAAAKS. This one doesn’t teach how to draw but it0s the introduction to that. Quite a lot of people I give classes to have this idea that the beak is an apendix of the bird’s skull and not a part of the skull that doesn’t have feathers covering it. And because of that wrong notion beaks are drawn poorly and with no sense of weight or even being part of the bird’s head.
So this art tip of the week is just the very introduction to the concept of drawing beaks. Just explaining what the beak actually is.
Hope you like it, even though its a simpler one. 
CHEERS and tons of love
zoologicalpt:

BIRD BEAAAKS. This one doesn’t teach how to draw but it0s the introduction to that. Quite a lot of people I give classes to have this idea that the beak is an apendix of the bird’s skull and not a part of the skull that doesn’t have feathers covering it. And because of that wrong notion beaks are drawn poorly and with no sense of weight or even being part of the bird’s head.
So this art tip of the week is just the very introduction to the concept of drawing beaks. Just explaining what the beak actually is.
Hope you like it, even though its a simpler one. 
CHEERS and tons of love
zoologicalpt:

BIRD BEAAAKS. This one doesn’t teach how to draw but it0s the introduction to that. Quite a lot of people I give classes to have this idea that the beak is an apendix of the bird’s skull and not a part of the skull that doesn’t have feathers covering it. And because of that wrong notion beaks are drawn poorly and with no sense of weight or even being part of the bird’s head.
So this art tip of the week is just the very introduction to the concept of drawing beaks. Just explaining what the beak actually is.
Hope you like it, even though its a simpler one. 
CHEERS and tons of love
zoologicalpt:

BIRD BEAAAKS. This one doesn’t teach how to draw but it0s the introduction to that. Quite a lot of people I give classes to have this idea that the beak is an apendix of the bird’s skull and not a part of the skull that doesn’t have feathers covering it. And because of that wrong notion beaks are drawn poorly and with no sense of weight or even being part of the bird’s head.
So this art tip of the week is just the very introduction to the concept of drawing beaks. Just explaining what the beak actually is.
Hope you like it, even though its a simpler one. 
CHEERS and tons of love

zoologicalpt:

BIRD BEAAAKS. This one doesn’t teach how to draw but it0s the introduction to that. Quite a lot of people I give classes to have this idea that the beak is an apendix of the bird’s skull and not a part of the skull that doesn’t have feathers covering it. And because of that wrong notion beaks are drawn poorly and with no sense of weight or even being part of the bird’s head.

So this art tip of the week is just the very introduction to the concept of drawing beaks. Just explaining what the beak actually is.

Hope you like it, even though its a simpler one. 

CHEERS and tons of love

(via morganlefae)

reeku-kun:

asami will fuck you up and look flawless doing it
reeku-kun:

asami will fuck you up and look flawless doing it
reeku-kun:

asami will fuck you up and look flawless doing it
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
aegors:

i know i’m late to the party but what can you do
likebirdsofprey:


Batgirl Year One #6
likebirdsofprey:


Batgirl Year One #6
likebirdsofprey:


Batgirl Year One #6

groansofcreation:

Keeping time counter-culturally.

Found the source: this is the Salt of the Earth Christian Seasons calendar, available for $15.95 at http://www.thechristiancalendar.com/ (not actually available now - it says the store will re-open at the end of August).

(via disgruntled-and-catholic)

groansofcreation:

Keeping time counter-culturally.

Can anyone tell us what this calendar is?

(via disgruntled-and-catholic)


"Let us anoint the master who will help lead us in our new path."

"Let us anoint the master who will help lead us in our new path."

"Let us anoint the master who will help lead us in our new path."

"Let us anoint the master who will help lead us in our new path."

When you are 13 years old,
the heat will be turned up too high
and the stars will not be in your favor.
You will hide behind a bookcase
with your family and everything left behind.
You will pour an ocean into a diary.
When they find you, you will be nothing
but a spark above a burning bush,
still, tell them
Despite everything, I really believe people are good at heart.

When you are 14,
a voice will call you to greatness.
When the doubters call you crazy, do not listen.
They don’t know the sound
of their own God’s whisper. Use your armor,
use your sword, use your two good hands.
Do not let their doubting
drown out the sound of your own heartbeat.
You are the Maid of Untamed Patriotism.
Born to lead armies into victory and unite a nation
like a broken heart.

When you are 15, you will be punished
for learning too proudly. A man
will climb onto your school bus and insist
your sisters name you enemy.
When you do not hide,
he will point his gun at your temple
and fire three times. Three years later,
in an ocean of words, with no apologies,
you will stand before the leaders of the world
and tell them your country is burning.

When you are 16 years old,
you will invent science fiction.
The story of a man named Frankenstein
and his creation. Soon after you will learn
that little girls with big ideas are more terrifying
than monsters, but don’t worry.
You will be remembered long after
they have put down their torches.

When you are 17 years old,
you will strike out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig
one right after the other.
Men will be afraid of the lightening
in your fingertips. A few days later
you will be fired from the major leagues
because “Girls are too delicate to play baseball”

You will turn 18 with a baby on your back
leading Lewis and Clark
across North America.

You will turn 18 
and become queen of the Nile.

You will turn 18 
and bring justice to journalism.

You are now 18, standing on the precipice,
trembling before your own greatness.

This is your call to leap.

There will always being those
who say you are too young and delicate
to make anything happen for yourself.
They don’t see the part of you that smolders.
Don’t let their doubting drown out the sound
of your own heartbeat.

You are the first drop of a hurricane.
Your bravery builds beyond you. You are needed
by all the little girls still living in secret,
writing oceans made of monsters and
throwing like lightening.

You don’t need to grow up to find greatness.
You are stronger than the world has ever believed you to be.
The world laid out before you to set on fire.
All you have to do
is burn.

neyruto:

a dystopian novel about some guy who works in the government and is just trying to get by while some shitty kids try and overthrow society

(via feelsforeverything)

mugglebornheadcanon:

488. Muggleborn Ravenclaws like leaving their calculus and algebra laying around and telling first years that it’s arithmancy.

what muggleborn 11-year-olds have calculus textbooks and why are they lugging them to hogwarts

(via cassycas)