I love being back in my home parish.

badlybehavedbookworm:

novangla:

badlybehavedbookworm:

The only thing I can think of that I wish we had was veiling. In Minnesota so many of the women veiled, and it was wonderful to join them - feeling the veil on your head really helps tie you to the place and the experience. It’s both an expression of modesty, faith, and it it helps me focus!

Do you think if I started veiling again that I would stick out too much? Or would it make other people who are used to veiling feel more comfortable and follow suit?

So I’m just going to be as honest as possible which is that I think expected/enforced veiling is terrible terrible terrible and if there is no man or woman in Christ than why are men baring their heads while women have to cover up? According to Corinthians, the reason women need to veil is because they are not made in the image of God but in the image of man, made for men and wow fuck that (it also says our hair shouldn’t be “shorn” and I see no problems with pixiecuts (I have one) or women with shaved heads going to mass)

IMO: everyone has to or no one has to, and that gendered misogynist “women aren’t made imago Dei" anti-Genesis-1:1 bullshit can happily go the way of not allowing laity to receive the chalice.

Because of that source material and the fact that it’s no longer required, I also think that if you show up at a church where people don’t veil there may be people who take your veiling as a sort of “look at me I’m so pre-VatII pious” and I would probably not approach anyone who was veiled for church in an obvious ~veiling~ way, because it reeks of TradCat and I don’t need to ruin a good church experience with a Trad conversation.

HOWEVER: those are just forewarnings, not reasons to not veil.  Any spiritual discipline that helps you in your prayer life and your experience of mass seems fair game to me.  If you have a husband telling you you need to or you do it to remind yourself of the submission of women, nopity nope nope.  If it helps you concentrate, great.  So go for it if that’s your thing!

And what I used to do in order to give a nod to the tradition, was to wear a fancy hat to mass.  That’s how many women in much of history followed “veiling” requirements. But that definitely also just fit into my fashion sense generally so it worked for me — vintage skirt, cardigan, little 1940s hat pinned to my curled bob.  As a Catholic I mostly saved this for feast days but once I started going to Anglo-Catholic Episcopal masses I did this nearly every Sunday that I could swing it until the hassle of switching between my scooter/motorcycle helmet and a hat become too much of a pain in the ass.

The great thing about veiling in modern society, in my opinion, is that - what I’ve seen of it - is really stripped of what some might consider it’s original misogyny. Because no one is standing at the door of the church doing head checks, no one is required to cover her head. .So the women that do so choose to do so for their own personal reasons. And it has less to do with not being made in God’s image, which we know to be not true since we are repeatedly told to opposite, and more to do with the reverence I was mentioning.

Also, someone pointed out to me the other day, that it is a right that - in the modern definition of veiling - is not only exclusive to women, but a tribute to our Holy Mother. An invitation to imitate her strength and goodness. Men don’t get the option of veiling during mass as an additional devotion.

There is, and I think this is wonderful, and up and coming resurgence of veiling among teenage catholic females for just this reason. It’s a right they can lay claim to that they do not have to share with the boys.

And I LOVE that you used to wear hats to Mass. One thing I should have mentioned in my original post was how versatile the modern practice of “veiling” can be - in that it doesn’t require the traditional lace veil. Hats are very popular, also scarfs, yes the original chapel veils, and also pashminas - there has even been a great sharing of head covering techniques between women of different faiths. 

LeeLach is a company based in Jerusalem that markets modest clothing to a variety of cultures and religions around the world, leading some modern Catholic women who veil to opt for the beautiful and practical tichel originally worn by Orthodox Jewish women. Or beautiful scarfs like Eastern Orthodox church members. Even the hijab - all of which has lead, rather than to anger over “misappropriation”, to this great dialogue between women of different faiths who all choose to cover their heads for reasons of religion, of modesty, or pride in their culture and their beliefs.

I have yet to meet one person, of any faith who, upon meeting someone else who covers, greet them with anything but welcome (and tips on how to better tie that scarf!).

Opps! This turned into a bit of a rant! Sorry, this is just such a moving topic for me. I think it’s beautiful, whether women choose to cover just during worship, or all day, every day.

And I know that in some corners of the world, covering the head is still a forced practice, used to oppress. But in someways I think that makes a woman’s right to choose to cover her head that much more important.

This is a great response!

To be clear, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with veiling itself — only when it’s a forced/expected thing or when it’s proof-texted with Corinthians.  I think it can be in many ways like cosmetics or shaving — serving an entirely different purpose obviously — but in the sense that you can be a feminist and choose to do it for your own reasons but women should know where it comes from and what factors might limit the objectivity of the choice, etc etc.  I guess my worry about doing it myself would be silently communicating to other women that I buy the Corinthians decree, which I certainly do not.  I wish the dialogue were more fully dominated by the kind you are expressing, rather than being a mix of that (which is a great sentiment) and sort of terrifying traditionalist attitudes that quote Corinthians or tell stories about how they weren’t sure about it but “it was really important to my husband and now I think it’s great.”  I probably wouldn’t’ve included that whole disclaimer except that as soon as I started researching (I was trying to figure out if there’s a cultural difference between hats and shawls and lace veils) I ran into that kind of stuff.

So I guess to me it’s like, what of this is for me? what of this is being expected of me by men? and what am I communicating to other girls and women in my parish?  ”It’s okay to veil” is obviously communicated but I think if you AREN’T a tradCat there’s kind of a duty to be public and clear about your belief that women aren’t secondary in the Church or in the eyes of God or any of that and this is humility and worship, not submission or averting scandal.  I mean, I also went to church with my girlfriend/fiancee/wife so that did its own counter-communication.

I’d actually really love it expanded so it’s not a right reserved to women but something anyone can do as a gesture of humility and Marian devotion.  Maybe it’s just me but I’d love to see little boys imitating their mothers and veiling to be like Mary too.  They may not have wombs but they’re still bearers of Christ in the Eucharist, right?  But then, I’m also Episcopalian Anglican and not RC, so my liturgical/church life is built more on an assumption that there is nothing a man can do that I can’t, so I don’t have the same need to reclaim spaces for myself, which could be more necessary in Roman or Eastern Orthodox circles.

mirelha:

Tri Martolod - Traditional (interpreted by Alan Stivell, Tri Yann, Gilles Servat and Dan Ar Braz)

Here is a perfect (and incredibly famous) example of Kan-ha-Diskan.

The song talks about three sailors who end up in Newfoundland after a really long and perilous journey. And as they make it to the nearest bar, exhausted, one of them is approached by a young woman who claims that she has recognized him. At first, they are confused, but then, they remember that indeed, she is Breton too!
It turns out that she met the sailor at stake in Nantes, where he later proposed to her. Time had passed since, he had become a sailor, she had left Brittany to settle in the New-World…
Usually, the song ends there, but I have heard different versions that mention what they all do after this strange plot twist. In one version, the other sailors decide to go home so they all return to Brittany. In another, they remain there and plan their wedding. I guess it’s all up to the mood of the singer ^^ 

(via my-ear-trumpet)

“We are united in blood, even though we have not yet managed to take necessary steps towards unity between us and perhaps the time has not yet come. Unity is a gift that we need to ask for. I knew a parish priest in Hamburg who was dealing with the beatification cause of a Catholic priest guillotined by the Nazis for teaching children the catechism. After him, in the list of condemned individuals, was a Lutheran pastor who was killed for the same reason. Their blood was mixed. The parish priest told me he had gone to the bishop and said to him: ‘I will continue to deal with the cause, but of both their causes, not just the Catholic priest’s.’ This is what ecumenism of blood is.”
Pope Francis (via chrysostmom)

(via awgusteen)

lucrezianoin:

novangla:

lucrezianoin:

This thing is so accurate it hurts.

"Everybody speaks English"
INFINITE LAUGHTER.

Oh no, clapping the pilot is only an Italian thing? I didn’t know!

Intriguingly I just saw a “white person joke” on tumblr that said white people culture was “clapping when the plane lands” and I didn’t reply/reblog but I was kind of bewildered because I have flown a lot (domestic in America, US-UK, and US-Paris) and never been on a plane where people clapped.  But I guess it’s a Continental European thing?

Weird “white people” joke  because I’ve read that in some South American countries they clap, Egypt, Turkey and in Mediterranean countries? I guess one of these people from these cultures get on a plane, start clapping, the culture is transmitted.

Yeahhhhhhh it was definitely one of those “someone on tumblr thought they were clever but were talking out of their ass” things.  When I googled clapping on planes one of the first things that came up was a Filipina’s article.

schmergo:

I want a movie about a kid who just so happens to be born a Classic Gothic Hero, but in modern day. His name would be like Byron Dangerfield or something. 

Whenever he has EMOTIONS, there are claps of thunder and lightning. Every time he leans against a piece of furniture, it turns out to open a secret passageway leading to some dark secret, until eventually he’s just like “REALLY, GUYS?” All bad dreams are prophetic, even if it’s just that Starbucks will be out of pumpkin spice syrup the next day. Every girl he talks to swoons a lot and has a tyrannical heavy-browed father who are all played by the same actor. Ravens flock around him.

There are inexplicably paintings with moving eyes and moving suits of armor everywhere he goes, even McDonalds. Every time he moves to a new apartment, there is ALWAYS a screaming woman chained up in the room above his, and she invariably sets the place on fire. He’s so over it.

(via eos999)

I love being back in my home parish.

badlybehavedbookworm:

The only thing I can think of that I wish we had was veiling. In Minnesota so many of the women veiled, and it was wonderful to join them - feeling the veil on your head really helps tie you to the place and the experience. It’s both an expression of modesty, faith, and it it helps me focus!

Do you think if I started veiling again that I would stick out too much? Or would it make other people who are used to veiling feel more comfortable and follow suit?

So I’m just going to be as honest as possible which is that I think expected/enforced veiling is terrible terrible terrible and if there is no man or woman in Christ than why are men baring their heads while women have to cover up? According to Corinthians, the reason women need to veil is because they are not made in the image of God but in the image of man, made for men and wow fuck that (it also says our hair shouldn’t be “shorn” and I see no problems with pixiecuts (I have one) or women with shaved heads going to mass)

IMO: everyone has to or no one has to, and that gendered misogynist “women aren’t made imago Dei" anti-Genesis-1:1 bullshit can happily go the way of not allowing laity to receive the chalice.

Because of that source material and the fact that it’s no longer required, I also think that if you show up at a church where people don’t veil there may be people who take your veiling as a sort of “look at me I’m so pre-VatII pious” and I would probably not approach anyone who was veiled for church in an obvious ~veiling~ way, because it reeks of TradCat and I don’t need to ruin a good church experience with a Trad conversation.

HOWEVER: those are just forewarnings, not reasons to not veil.  Any spiritual discipline that helps you in your prayer life and your experience of mass seems fair game to me.  If you have a husband telling you you need to or you do it to remind yourself of the submission of women, nopity nope nope.  If it helps you concentrate, great.  So go for it if that’s your thing!

And what I used to do in order to give a nod to the tradition, was to wear a fancy hat to mass.  That’s how many women in much of history followed “veiling” requirements. But that definitely also just fit into my fashion sense generally so it worked for me — vintage skirt, cardigan, little 1940s hat pinned to my curled bob.  As a Catholic I mostly saved this for feast days but once I started going to Anglo-Catholic Episcopal masses I did this nearly every Sunday that I could swing it until the hassle of switching between my scooter/motorcycle helmet and a hat become too much of a pain in the ass.

dick-of-saint-vick:

dick-of-saint-vick:

2ndhalfoflife:

dick-of-saint-vick:

friendly reminder that if you think American mainline Protestantism is anythingbetter than trash, I grew up in it and I have some bad news for you friend


I have a question: what constitutes “American mainline…


Yeah, but your clergy isn’t cis-only, your denominational standard Bible (the NRSV) isn’t stocked in Christian bookstores, and you don’t generally advertise your 10:30 contemporary services on the radio.

I don’t really get the connection between mainline/not and advertising on the radio…  But I wouldn’t give the definition as “those who identify by their denomination rather than Christian”.

Mainline Protestants are those Protestant denominations that are not dominated by evangelical, fundamentalist, or charismatic practice or doctrine (though you can have evangelicals, fundamentalists, and charismatics within a mainline denom).

They’re also pretty staid, moderately liberal, usually accept biblical historical criticism, and are very keen on ecumenism.  Not sure why that’s trash.  I didn’t grow up in it because I grew up secular but I’m in it now and I did go to seminary and while there are plenty of flaws, it’s a lot better than trash (and a lot better than evangelical/fundamentalist and no worse than RC or Eastern Orthodoxy).

lucrezianoin:

This thing is so accurate it hurts.

"Everybody speaks English"
INFINITE LAUGHTER.

Oh no, clapping the pilot is only an Italian thing? I didn’t know!

Intriguingly I just saw a “white person joke” on tumblr that said white people culture was “clapping when the plane lands” and I didn’t reply/reblog but I was kind of bewildered because I have flown a lot (domestic in America, US-UK, and US-Paris) and never been on a plane where people clapped.  But I guess it’s a Continental European thing?

petitedilly:

mspaintadventuring:

guys-relax-im-the-doctor:

GUYS CAN WE TAKE A MOMENT TO APPRECIATE THESE BEAUTIFUL GLASS PENSimage

I MEANimage

SERIOUSLY

 image

THESE

image

ARE

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THE 

image

PRETTIEST 

image

FRICKEN

image

PENS

image

EVER

image

IF

image

YOU

image

DONT

image

THINK

image

THESE

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ARE

image

COOL
image

THEN

image

THERE

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MUST

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BE

image

SOMETHING

image

WRONG

image

WITH

image

YOU

image

SERIOUSLY 

image

THEY’RE LIKE WANDS

Elvish !

Yeah I used to own one (the one after “DON’T” - in the same color even, I think) and they’re actually a total pain in the ass to write with, far too heavy, the way the ink is stored should be awesome but ended up getting ink all over my fingers. I know everyone is different so go for it but imo it was a stupid purchase 3/10 would not recommend

sorry

(via claryssant)

awgusteen:

 
I would want to know what she means by “relationship” and why she thinks Catholics don’t have it. Because I’ve met some Catholics who talk a lot about conversations with Jesus and the Spirit led them to turn left at this hallway corner etc
She just thinks all Catholics (and other liturgical Christians) aren’t genuine in their faith and just do “empty rituals”. 
I tried to explain that part of the way we relate to God is through the Eucharist and she was like ‘but that’s just eating a cracker and drinking wine” and claims that “catholics don’t believe that jesus saves you and so you have to do works” 
I JUST

Ugh I’d respond there ARE people who do empty rituals but there are also plenty of evangelical Christians are also just doing “empty rituals” by singing along with the praise band and waving their hands etc while not actually having a true and lasting change of heart (i.e. conversion).

And if you actually look at / listen to the words of a BCP Eucharist, most of the time we’re listening to scripture and the story of how Jesus saved all of us.  And you are expected to have a personal prayer and devotional life outside of Sunday worship, because going to Eucharist is coming in touch with Christ and allowing yourself to be transformed, and to make that meaningful  you do have to maintain a “relationship” through the day/week both in living out that transformation “so that we may dwell in us, and we in him” and in preparation.  You “do works” because true faith results in true works, and if you claim faith without changing character or living compassionately, your faith is empty and dead and not real faith so gtfo (and you can proof-text that shit in a number of ways).

I’d also just be like, bitch show me where Catholics say Jesus doesn’t save you or shut the fuck up because you are judging people you clearly know nothing about.  If everything you think were true, you’d have some justification, but you are speaking from ignorance and hear-say rumor and that sure as hell isn’t Christian or Christ-like.  (I guess you could tone it down if necessary to maintain peace, but not too much).

jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.
jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.
These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.
Yeah.
They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.
These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.
And the metro is always this clean.
In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.
Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.
We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.

jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.

These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.

Yeah.

They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.

These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.

And the metro is always this clean.

In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.

Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.

We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.

(via andythelemon)

Anglicans may indeed be people who do things “decently and in order”, well and good; but this is our cultural heritage, not our theological foundation. Anglicanism does not mean formality in liturgy; Anglo-Catholicism does not mean the use of Fortescue’s Ritual Notes. We enact what we think of as characteristic catholic ritual at the Eucharist, not because of its agreeable aesthetics but because of the remarkable sacrament; not because of the tradition, but because of the Gospel….

The Eucharist proclaims a wider reality about God’s love for and presence in the world; the God once incarnate in Galilee can be present here with us in bread and wine, but is also present still in that world God loves so much. Hence the great tradition of heroic social service and advocacy that was so famously encapsulated in Bishop Frank Weston’s manifesto at the 1923 Anglo-Catholic congress: “You cannot claim to worship Jesus in the Tabernacle, if you do not pity Jesus in the slum.” In the Eucharist Christ calls us to serve him in the world.

Catholic Anglicanism stands ultimately on these affirmations, not on ceremony. Our future as a means of God’s action in the world depends on our willingness to receive Christ in the Eucharist, for ourselves, for each other, and for the world. However well or badly we worship in ritual terms, we affirm with gratitude that in the Eucharist as otherwise it is God who has acted, God who has spoken, God who has given; for this we humbly give thanks, worshipping the Word made flesh who still comes among us as bread and wine, transforming us for his work in the world.

writers-cube:

So my “I’m going to finish editing TRK before the summer is over” plan went about as well as Arthur’s “let’s leave Mordred as regent while I’m on the Continent” plan. 

It is August 30th. I have just reached Chapter 10. Out of 35.

image

Man I feel this feel

"Oh I have a summer vacation I can actually finally finish Book 2!"

Nopity nope, haven’t written in at least a week


[Aang] - [Katara] - [Sokka] - [Toph] - [Zuko]

[Aang] - [Katara] - [Sokka] - [Toph] - [Zuko]

[Aang] - [Katara] - [Sokka] - [Toph] - [Zuko]

[Aang] - [Katara] - [Sokka] - [Toph] - [Zuko]

[Aang] - [Katara] - [Sokka] - [Toph] - [Zuko]

Character Voice Consistency

thedancingwriter:

Keeping a character’s voice consistent throughout a book can be a challenge. There are a multitude of factors to maintaining a character’s voice. Keep in mind that as the character develops, the voice doesn’t change. A character’s voice at its core can best be described as a character’s personality. Here are a few factors for you to consider:

  • Social class
  • Intelligence
  • Background
  • Extrovert or introvert
  • Sense of humor or seriousness
  • Long sentences or short, crisp ones
  • Impulsive or logical
  • How character views surroundings
  • How character makes decisions
  • What character observes first

And many, many more…

Let me use my character, Amelia Gareth from When Stars Die, to give you an example of voice consistency by answering some of the points above.

  1. Social class: Amelia comes from the upper class in the 19th century, so when she speaks or narrates, her exposition and dialogue are going to have a formality to them that someone from the lower class wouldn’t have.
  2. Intelligence: Amelia is sharp, so when she is in a situation that demands an immediate answer, she is able to come up with one, no matter how impulsive or illogical it may be. She has to be intelligent to survive in her world.
  3. Background: Before Amelia came to Cathedral Reims, she mostly lived at her manor, hardly venturing outside, so she isn’t very worldly. Even at Cathedral Reims she is confined and only allowed certain knowledge taught by the nuns. So the cathedral suppresses her chances at personal development. Thus, her actions and dialogue are going to mirror this lack of worldliness, so she often comes off as immature.
  4. Extrovert or Introvert: Amelia is an extrovert. She wants to be around people. She wants friends, as she didn’t have many at home. She is fiercely protective of her younger brother and will do whatever it takes to protect him. She also isn’t afraid to voice her feelings when she finds something disagreeable. She’s terrified of ending up alone. She is concerned with her external world.
  5. Long sentences or short, crisp ones. Amelia might fall somewhere in between. She exists in the 19th century, so brevity wasn’t too much of a thing. If you’ve ever read books published in the 19th century, you’ll know this. However, her voice had to be adjusted for a more modern audience, so she can’t be too wordy. But her thought process isn’t clipped. It’s detailed.
  6. Impulsive or logical: Due to her background, she is impulsive. She is about her happiness, about protecting her younger brother. When either of these things are threatened, she doesn’t think logically to find a solution.
  7. Surroundings: When Amelia views her surroundings, she views them in detail. When the story begins, she has only been at the cathedral for three years, so she has been trapped in her manor for fifteen, so it’s like the world is new to her.
  8. Decisions: She’s never been confronted with the harsh realities of life, so, as stated above, her decisions are impulsive.
  9. Observations: Because of what she’s gone through, she’ll note the negative things first. Witches are despised in her world, so she’ll generally relate that negativity to the state of the world overall. When she can’t find anything negative, she’ll note the positive, but she’ll think of a crisp, blue sky as something that shouldn’t be there because of the world she lives in.
  10. Sense of humor or seriousness: You can probably tell Amelia is serious. There is a lot going against her, so she feels like she cannot relax.

So when doing a character outline for voice, keep these things in mind and anything else you can think of to keep your character’s voice consistent. Refer to this outline constantly. Step into your character’s shoes and ask, “How would she/he react? How would he/she respond to a character telling him/her something?” And so on and so forth. Also, if it has been a couple of days since you’ve last written, read the previous few pages to get back into your character’s voice. Simply put, become your character.

(via caiprince13)